TAPS Archives: I-O

In remembrance of those who served, those who sacrificed,
those we left behind, and the ones who carry on.
We thank you for your service.

 

The TAPS archives are arranged alphabetically by last name.  Readers are welcome to send information
on 3/26 members for posting.  waltwhitesides@verizon.net

TAPS Archives – Paul Johnson

Paul Lewis “PJ” Johnson, 72, was born in Fargo, N.D., Aug. 17, 1948, to Robert Marshall and Elaine Barbara (Olson) Johnson.

During his childhood, he found a love of archery shooting. This sport became a favorite activity in which Paul and his father would compete. The whole family, including his mother, older brother Jim and younger sister Barbara, would travel around the United States to competitions. In 1960, at age 12, Paul became the National Junior Archery Champion. Paul graduated from Fargo North High School in 1966 and enrolled in the United States Marine Corps.

Paul was a member of 2nd Platoon, India Company, 3rd Battalion, 26th Marine Regiment during most of 1968 in Vietnam. He was the Squad Leader for the machine gun teams and served on Hill 881 South at Khe Sanh. He was discharged in 1970.

After his service with the U.S. Marine Corps, Paul moved back to Fargo to attend North Dakota State University where he earned an animal science degree. Upon completion, he moved to Pullman to begin his career at the Washington State University School of Veterinary Medicine. He spent the next 30 years as the instructional supervisor in the Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology and Physiology Department, now Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience. PJ was key in establishing and managing the Worthman Anatomy Museum and provided expert oversight of the veterinary anatomy area in McCoy Hall. During this time, almost every single vet student would pass through the lab. All who were lucky enough had the occasion to write part of their story with PJ. He was just that type of person; always willing to lend a hand and share something to take along in life. He helped generations of students become veterinarians. Paul retired in 2010.

Paul also had a passion for running and horses. Throughout his career, alongside colleagues and friends, he completed thousands of miles on foot while training on the Pullman streets, country roads and Martin Stadium stairs to compete in road races, marathons and a 100-mile Western States race in Southern California. He also completed several races called Ride and Tie where he ran and rode horses with a human team member and horse team member over mountainous terrains for 30 miles or more. This became another event where family would join. On these trips, it was now Paul’s family traveling around the western coast of the U.S. and Canada.

Once Paul retired, he appeared determined to become a reclusive mountain man and create a place where he could live off the grid. However, beneath his put-on crusty demeanor, he stayed active running into his 60s (logging his 60,000th mile on his 60th birthday), riding horses and “hogs” (motorcycles), and working to preserve the 25 acres where he resided. Most of all, Paul continued nourishing relationships with his family and all the people he met throughout his life — the childhood friends, the old and new Marine Corps jarheads, the vet school students and colleagues who became friends, the running friends and any others he met along the way including, the medical treatment people that became friends even at the end.

Paul could be mistaken as a quiet, humble man; however, he always had a story to share from a past adventure as well as a prideful narrative about his son, daughter, son-in-law or most beloved grandchildren.

Paul was diagnosed with myoepithelial carcinoma in March 2020. His treatment plan was aggressive in an effort to delay this rare and rapidly growing cancer; however, after two surgeries and chemo and radiation treatments, the cancer continued to spread to his chest and lungs, ultimately sending him to rest peacefully and pain-free at home Saturday, Nov. 14, 2020. He was in the care of hospice and surrounded by his daughter’s family (Sara, husband John, and three grandchildren), as well as close friends who are like family — just as he wished.

Paul is survived by his son, Brent Johnson; daughter Sara Eisenbarth (Johnson); son-in law John Eisenbarth; and three grandchildren, Jared Eisenbarth, Gavin Eisenbarth and Ella Eisenbarth; sister Barbara Douglas (Johnson); brother-in-law David Douglas; and two nieces and their families, Miel Dotson (Silbernagel) and Coco Peterson (Silbernagel).

TAPS Archives – Dick Jones

Richard A. Jones, 65 of Rockland died on August 10, 2011 at the Brockton VA Medical Center surrounded by his family after a courageous battle with cancer. Dick was born in Boston, son of James A. and Louise F. (Mooney) Jones and was raised and educated in Weymouth. He attended Northeastern University and the Boston Architectural College. He later received a Masters Degree in Transportation Planning from Boston University. He was a proud veteran of the United States Marine Corps having attained the rank of Corporal and being awarded the Purple Heart for his service during the Vietnam War.

Mr. Jones was the principle in his own architectural firm RAD Jones Co. for many years. He was a member of the Boston Society of Architects, the American Institute of Architects and he had served as a professor at the Boston Architectural College for several years.

An active and devoted communicant of Holy Family Parish in Rockland. Husband of Diane (Lapworth) Jones and the late Christine M. (Conville) Jones he is also survived by his children Scott D. Jones, Todd P. Jones, Matthew M. Jones, as well as his wife’s children, Scott J. Lapworth and his wife Amanda of CT and Emily D. Lapworth of Milton. He was the brother of James Jones of NM and Stephan Jones of NH. Also surviving are his beloved grandchildren, Asrat, Henok, Brooke, TJ, Trevor and Emma.

TAPS Archives – Wayne E. Jones

Richard A. Jones, 65 of Rockland died on August 10, 2011 at the Brockton VA Medical Center surrounded by his family after a courageous battle with cancer. Dick was born in Boston, son of James A. and Louise F. (Mooney) Jones and was raised and educated in Weymouth. He attended Northeastern University and the Boston Architectural College. He later received a Masters Degree in Transportation Planning from Boston University. He was a proud veteran of the United States Marine Corps having attained the rank of Corporal and being awarded the Purple Heart for his service during the Vietnam War.

Mr. Jones was the principle in his own architectural firm RAD Jones Co. for many years. He was a member of the Boston Society of Architects, the American Institute of Architects and he had served as a professor at the Boston Architectural College for several years.

An active and devoted communicant of Holy Family Parish in Rockland. Husband of Diane (Lapworth) Jones and the late Christine M. (Conville) Jones he is also survived by his children Scott D. Jones, Todd P. Jones, Matthew M. Jones, as well as his wife’s children, Scott J. Lapworth and his wife Amanda of CT and Emily D. Lapworth of Milton. He was the brother of James Jones of NM and Stephan Jones of NH. Also surviving are his beloved grandchildren, Asrat, Henok, Brooke, TJ, Trevor and Emma.

TAPS Archives – Paul Lowery

Paul Lowery died peacefully in his sleep October 7, 2017 surrounded by loved ones. He was raised in San Francisco in Forest Hill and was an alumnus of private San Francisco schools St. Boniface and Stuart Hall. Paul was a devout Roman Catholic and had a near perfect attendance for attending weekly mass. In his life he attended countless novenas. He was deeply devoted to Our Lady of Perpetual Help and St. Joan of Arc. He loved to say the rosary and could recite it in English, French and Spanish.

He graduated from Lincoln High School in June 1968. 48 hours later he enlisted in the US Marine Corps. Six months later Paul was deployed to Viet Nam and assigned to 3rd Battalion 26th Marines. During his tour Paul was awarded a Purple Heart, a Naval Commendation Medal with a Combat V, and a Meritorious Promotion. One of his assignments was to the hazardous Helicopter Support Team. Upon returning home Paul enrolled in UC Berkeley and earned a BA in Political Science in 1975. After earning his degree he went to Europe for a year. He spent much time in France as he spoke excellent French. Paul loved to read Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal. For years Paul was a docent at the de Young Museum and the Legion of Honor. He lectured widely on the Hudson River School of Painters. He could lecture authoritatively on the complete works of Winslow Homer and Edward Hopper.

In 1981 Paul enrolled in San Francisco State University as a graduate student in Political Science. In 1984 Paul became a United States Postal Inspector. Paul worked a variety of high profile cases throughout the nation during his career as a Postal Inspector. In 1985 Paul married the love of his life G. Susana and they have remained married for 33 years. They have two children, Sean and Alexandria. Both are graduates of UC Davis. In 2004 Paul retired from the Postal Inspection Service. Promptly he began teaching Criminal Justice at a number of nearby universities. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, in Cotati, CA prior to internment at Arlington National Cemetery. 

TAPS Archives – Titus McClenton

Titus” June” Rulax McClenton, Jr. was born July 20, 1947, to the late Titus R. McClenton, Sr. and Clara Doretha Irving. Titus was raised by his mother Clara D. Briggs and his “father” the late Johnnie P. Briggs in Greensboro, NC.   Although, Titus was short in stature, that never stopped him from being an active player for the James B. Dudley High School football or wrestling team. He also was an avid learner of the martial arts; earning a brown belt in Karate.

Titus enlisted into the United States Marine Corp September 17, 1965; often stating they were the “Bravest of the Brave.”   Sgt. T. R. McClenton served in the Vietnam War; receiving the Vietnamese Campaign Medal and the Vietnamese Service Medal. In 1969, he was recognized for his participation in the Presidential Inauguration of Richard Milhous Nixon.  He was then selected to serve with the Marine Security Guards at the American Embassy in Hong Kong B. C. C.; assigned to protect the U.S. Governments classified matters. Sgt. McClenton was injured during his tour in Bangkok and was discharged October 07, 1971; earning him a Purple Heart, a Good Conduct Medal, and the National Defense Service Medal. 

During his tour of service in Hong Kong, he met the love of his life Annie Li, whom he married. Titus and Annie had two sons, Titus R. McClenton III, and John Michael McClenton. His family was later joined by the addition of his adopted son Tony Hendrix.

After returning home, Titus was employed at the United States Postal Service until he retired April 9, 2002, after 36 years of complete service. Throughout the years he was active with several organizations; Kalif Temple #144 of Greensboro, NC, and the James B. Dudley Alumni Association. He also loved attending North Carolina A&T football games.  If you really knew the “One Hot Dog”; then you knew his real passion was playing cards with his friends and co-workers often after completing his shift at work.  He played on several card teams.  He also loved his James B. Dudley Graduation Class of 1965. He continued his love of the military by often volunteering at the Veterans Affairs Office in Greensboro, NC.

Titus loved his grandkids and was a mentor and father figure. His home became a safe haven for many young men throughout the years.  

He is preceded in death by his parents, Titus R. McClenton, Sr., Clara D. Briggs, Johnnie P. Briggs; his brother, Michael A. Briggs and adopted son, Tony Hendrix. He leaves to cherish his memory wife Annie Li McClenton, sons Titus R. McClenton III, John Michael McClenton (wife, Veronica), three sisters Paulette Schnyder, Patricia Smith, Clarice Washington all of Greensboro NC; seven grandchildren, nieces and nephews; and a host of family and friends.

Funeral services were held Sunday, August 5, 2018 at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1210 S Eugene St, Greensboro.  Interment was on Monday, August 6, 2018 at Salisbury National Cemetery.

TAPS Archives – William “Doc” P. Miller

William “Doc” P. Miller, age 70, of Lower Allen Township, Pennsylvania died on Monday November 6, 2017 at Holy Spirit Hospital, Ortenzio Heart Center in Camp Hill, PA. Born in Tremont, PA on March 12, 1947. He was the third son of the late Frank “Mank” Miller and Veronica “Verna” (Cleary) Miller, and loving brother to the late Frank Sr. and John Miller. Bill was a Food Inspector for The Commonwealth of PA, Dept. of Agriculture, until his retirement in the early 90’s.

He was a Navy Corpsman in the Vietnam War assigned to Lima 3/26, also a member of Our Lady of Lourdes Church, Enola PA; Knights of Columbus, Council No. 4068; and The National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association. A life time member of V.F.W. Post 7415, and American Legion Post 143,  Amvets Post #286, Khe Sanh Veterans, and P. W. Milano Marine Corps League Detachment #299. He was also a fisherman, hunter, gardener, gun maker, an avid fan of the Philadelphia Phillies and New York Yankees.

He enjoyed spending time with his family and Vietnam Vet brothers, “The Filthy Few”. Surviving are his caring and loving wife of 40 years, Carol Ann (Mellott) Miller; a loving son; William P. Miller Jr, of Lemoyne; two loving daughters; Lisa M. Lucas, of Chalfont, Pa, and Bernadette R. Bransom, of Philadelphia, A loving brother; Robert, of Tremont, Pa., two loving Sons in Law; Stephen Lucas and Thomas Bransom, Nine loving grandchildren; Stephen Jr., Taylor, Chase, Lauren, Brenee, Carly, Nathan, Hailey, Cedahlia and his cherished great granddaughter, Lilith.

Perley H. Morse, Jr.

Cpl. Perley H Morse Jr. passed away peacefully at home September 24th 2023 in Longmont Colorado after a long battle with cancer. He was born in Staten Island, New York on August 27th, 1946 to Perley Morse Senior and Helen Morse. He entered the Marine Corps at the age of 18 and served in Vietnam, surviving the Battle of Khe Sanh, until being wounded in June 1968 by an 82 mm mortar. He received the Purple Heart and was medically retired from the Marines. He worked for the State of NH Corrections Department, reaching the rank of Lieutenant, and retired after 30 years of service. 

He is survived by his wife Marie, daughters Marissa and Lea, son Kamal and his grandsons, Ronin and Quintin, who he loved very much. He also leaves his sister Helen, nieces and a nephew.

He was a wonderful storyteller, wood carver and friend to so many. There was nothing he loved more than to make others laugh. He will be missed by so many more than can be named here.  In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Rocky Mountain Cancer Center (https://rayofhopecolorado.org/rmcc/) for the care and extra years of joy we all got to enjoy with him.  Services will be held in Bow, New Hampshire in the spring.

(Posted September 2023)

 

TAPS Archives – Gen. Carl Epting Mundy Jr.

The Marine Corps’ 30th commandant, retired Gen. Carl Epting Mundy Jr., has died, his family confirmed to Marine Corps Times. He was 78.

Mundy was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma, several months ago, said his son-in-law, Bob Gunter. He died April 2 at his home in Alexandria, Va.

Mundy served as commandant from 1991 to 1995 and helped to restructure the Marine Corps following the denouement of the Cold War.

According to a biography curated at the United States Marine Corps History Division, “General Mundy was noted for his emphasis on ‘people issues’ and core values of honor, courage and commitment. During his tenure, ‘From the Sea’ became the Navy-Marine Corps joint strategic concept, wherein the Navy and Marine Corps reoriented doctrinal focus toward littoral warfare.”

Mundy served in the Vietnam War from 1966-67 and earned, among other awards, the Bronze Star with combat valor device, and the Purple Heart.

Following his retirement in 1995 after a 38-year military career, Mundy went on to serve as president and CEO of the USO and also served as chairman of the Marine Corps University Foundation.

Mundy’s two sons followed him into the Marine Corps. His oldest son, Brig. Gen. Carl E. Mundy III currently serves as commanding general of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade in California, while Col. Timothy S. Mundy serves as chief of staff for Combat Development and Integration at Marine Corps Combat Development Command in Quantico, Va. He also survived by a daughter, Elizabeth Gunter.

Mundy’s wife of 56 years, Linda Sloan Mundy, died last June. She was 78.

In a statement released April 3, Marine Commandant Gen. Jim Amos called Mundy “a valiant warrior, a dedicated public servant, and a good and decent man.”

Mundy “served with honor and distinction through more than four decades of devotion to country and Corps,” Amos said in the statement. “All Marines mourn his passing but celebrate his lasting legacy of service and leadership. … Bonnie and I offer our deepest condolences to his family.”

The TAPS archives are arranged alphabetically by last name.  Readers are welcome to send information on 3/26 members for posting.  waltwhitesides@verizon.net